I'm on a Flannery O'Connor kick.


"Listen" . . ."I ain't got but a dollar sixteen cent and I want me one of them ..."
"You can keep it, ". . .taking the bucket off the card table, "This ain't no cut-rate joint."

Chapter 3      WiseBlood     Flannery O'Connor

The Trifecta Writing Challenge today is to choose 33 words or less from your favorite book or author. For a reader, is there any such thing. With Flannery O'Conner, you could use something from most pages.

Flannery O'Connor wrote Southern Gothic stories which did not appeal to me at first. I read the collection of her personal letters called "The Habit of Being" which helped me understand her writing immensely. Now I read and re-read her work. The prose is incredible.

Picture attribution:  By Cmacauley (Robie with Flannery 1947.jpg) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AFlannery-O'Connor_1947.jpg

Comments

  1. I might give her a try again...I did not care for her the first time around. Maybe try her short stories.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I checked to see if you were from the Southeast. Missouri is close enough to get the texture of her language. I really did not care for O'Connor. I took writing classes and she was the mold that had been broken. So I decided to read her until I got her. The lightbulb is on but no where as bright as it should be. Her stories are grotesque but they are meant to be humorous.
    What pulled me in the most was reading the collection of her letters. She made me think of a a greataunt of mine. So many phrases were so hillbilly. She truly is a Southern writer and unique. The rich language is what draws me to her stories. Her stories are heavy-handed with the flawed nature of man and the grace of God which was a little too brutal and in your face when I first read her stories.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I grew up in and live still, in Atlanta, Georgia. I went to the University of Alabama. Reading Flannery is like drinking Coca-Cola or cheering for college football. You have to do it.

    good 33

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm a prime example of education is wasted on the young. I thought I didn't care for O'Connor but everybody and their brother who writes loves her. So, I decided to read her until I got her. She is brilliant.

      Delete
  4. Never read Flannery O'Connor but, anyone described as being "grotesque but....humorous" peaks my curiosity. Thanks for the introduction.

    ReplyDelete
  5. adding books to my "must read" list. I'm not sure I've ever read her. hmmmmm

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I recommend the "Habit of Being" which is a collection of letters. She made me think of a great aunt of mine. My family is hillbilly. However, I think an Alaskan can understand hillbilly even if it is a Georgia one. Chuckles.

      Delete
  6. This is a great quote - it's so different but with such underlying awesomeness!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The language is so subtle with its debt of meaning.

      Delete
  7. I have not read any Flannery O'Connor, but you have me intrigued now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like a deep read. Lots of fluff out there and Flannery O'Connor is definitely not fluff.

      Delete
  8. Might not be my cup of tea, but I love the words you chose (:

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Understand. I made up my mind to read her until I got her. Then I was hooked. I enjoy your writing.

      Delete
  9. Oh love it. I'll have to check her out!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Gothic doesn't sound like my cup of tea, but I'll give her a go.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Your thoughts.

Popular Posts