Saturday, July 11, 2015

Temple Beth Israel - Inspired Sundays

Temple Beth Israel, Macon, GA, USA
I've shown a few rural churches, and I thought it was time I posted larger buildings of worship. In the middle Georgia area there is more diversity than people expect.

The Temple Beth Israel formed a congregation on October 30, 1859. This particular building was built in 1902. Originally the congregation was Orthodox as most congregations were at the time. Their service followed the German Minhag in Hebrew and German. Today the congregation is Reform Judaism.

20 comments:

  1. interesting ... i wonder if it has always been a church? it has a government or office building feel? i love that it is named after me. way cool. great addition this week thanks for sharing. ( :

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    1. I think I like the Scottish origin of you name which is "lively". Beth is anglicized Hebrew for "House of", lol. Of course Elisabeth has a better meaning which is Glory of God.

      It has always been a Temple.

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  2. Laughed at Beth's comment. :-) That's quite an imposing temple. Interesting that it started out Orthodox...

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    1. By the time the temple was built in 1902, the congregation was Reform. From what I read, they were all Orthodox at that time.

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  3. I'm always interested in the number of doors on houses of worship. I find few with three. Very nice. Tom The Backroads Traveller

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    1. I thought it would be a nice start for a series of small city homes of worship.

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  4. Wow, that is quite the building. Nothing much like tat one around here.

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    1. It is one of many in Macon, Georgia. I am going to take many more pictures of buildings to gradually put online.

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  5. I wondered also what the building started out as.

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    1. I'm not Jewish, so I don't know what is reflected in it's design. I am speculating that the grand architecture found in the United States during this time period is reflected.

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  6. Wow, you really do have diversity there. I enjoyed your header with all the cats.

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    1. I live in the country so cats are handy. I own two elderly cats that live in the house now. The coyotes are too attracted to cats.

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  7. Never come across that church before but you can see the building looked orthodox with the portico

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    1. It is a beautiful building. I've got time (I hope) to display so many places of worship and will.

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  8. It looks like it should be a government center rather than a place of worship.
    Susan Says

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    1. It does. I guess because I always knew it was a temple, that is what a temple looked like to me. I have looked up Synagogue architecture and it turns out there is no specific style.

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  9. Hi Ann,

    I was going to type very quietly because I though it was a library :)

    Gary

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    1. he, he - You were typing quietly, I didn't even hear you. Good comment.

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Your thoughts.