Friday, May 12, 2017

Oh Those Handicapped Parking Spaces

After this blog post, I will retire this theme.

I have handicapped placards and tags for handicapped family members. I park in the back of the lot when it is me and when getting my sister out in her wheelchair. With the wheelchair it doesn't matter if you are near or far. You just need space for the wheelchair to come close to the seat with the door wide open. Plus no one accidentally scratches your car when they don't park next to it.

I think many who deal with handicapped people get a stronger view of not using a handicapped space if you don't need it. My pet peeve is the person who backs into a handicapped space without the appropriate tag or placard. You can't help but wonder if they really need the space or are cheating the system.

In the end, it takes a pretty self centered person to park there when they don't need to. And that is a handicap too. Just not one that needs the parking space.

There is a stink in the paper where a young woman got a cruel note accusing her of not needing the space and she has a heart condition. I see both sides. I have seen people hop out of a car with a spring in their step after parking in a handicapped space. You have to wonder. But not all handicaps are visible.

But I have made observations about how people treat the handicapped.

The first one is that black people do a better job training their children. African Americans are quicker to assist my elderly mother. If you look at a black male, they will come and ask if you need help. They step aside at doorways and don't rush past your mother to get in quicker.

I have noticed people pretend to read posts or examine the coke machines as my mother slowly enters. This is where I know it is training. I have always done this. My parents did it. My mom never said, "Pretend to look at the wall of the building or stare in the parking lot until the slower person crosses the threshold". Much like no one was taught to make a quick shove to get by. And yes, I have seen the shove and steadied my mother. If I had had time and position, I would have stuck my foot out to trip them and have a little instant Karma.

I'm not one to believe in Karma. A young man in Hawaii did not want to ride my mother's handicapped scooter off a lift. I had my hands full getting her up a staircase. Mom was afraid of the lift. His dad told him to not play with handicap equipment, you may need to use it one day as a result. I agree with his dad that handicap equipment is not a toy. But being lazy using a handicapped space you don't need does affect your physical fitness. So, you might need it because you lose the ability to move.

I've had an elderly woman honking her horn at me to hurry up. I was parked in a handicapped space and was assisting my sister from the wheelchair into the car. I was not getting the wheelchair and my rump back in the car fast enough. She was tired of waiting. I had two other people who were handicapped that needed to return. But I backed up and parked in the back of the lot. When I walked into the store to check on the other two in my car, the same lady was standing talking to another older woman.

Like that phrase, "Nothing is as queer as folks."

Old but no handicap tag!

21 comments:

  1. People who park in those spots that don't need it are rude.

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    1. Thoughtless is what comes to mind for me.

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  2. Ann, this was a wonderful post.
    Handicap parking is a subject that needs to be renewed again and again.
    I, too, have seen the issues that you have described here, over and over again.

    Have a lovely day~

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    1. You can't know something unless you experience it or are told. I feel iffy parking in one for the family member that needs it. I can't imagine parking there without need.

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  3. It has never crossed my mind as an option to park in a handicapped reserved space. I have noticed some places don't seem to have enough designated, and others always have extra empty ones. A place really should give some thought to their clientele and volume on busy days.
    Barbara @ Caneyhead

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    1. I used to try to get the closest parking space because I thought that is what you should do. Then I dealt with a handicapped mother. I no longer try for a close space.

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  4. Interesting observations about other people treating those who are handicapped. I tend to try to make eye contact and smile, maybe I shouldn't? I do agree about the parking spaces. Keep them for those that really need the spaces. I've learned not to judge if I see a perfectly capable person coming out of their vehicle when parked in a handicapped space to question if they are disabled or not. I figure its between them and their conscious or their God if they have one for their accountability.

    betty

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    1. I've heard that people tend to ignore those in wheelchairs. However, I have noticed a lot of people go out of their way to give my sister a cheery smile. It does make you feel good.

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  5. People who do it need to get a flat tire. I've seen so many shove by too. I pretend I'm reading or something until they get going. Unless, young or old, two people are gabbing in the middle of the aisle and not moving, then I'll shove through them lol

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    1. Like I say, I don't believe in karma. But in this case, it would be nice.

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  6. When a young person parks with a hanger on their rearview mirror, you know they are abusing it.

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    1. I've seen some disgusting ones. One parked across from us and let their girls out to go in the store. I got myself organised and proceeded to get my sister out in her wheelchair. The people were friendly so we smiled and waved. It's Georgia. Before we got in the store, they were backing out of the parking place. I guess they felt they could do better.

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  7. My youngest brother makes a point of approaching people who park in a handicapped space without the necessary tags and saying 'I see your disability is intellectual'.
    I have the tags, but only use them on a bad day.

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    1. My thing used to be to take pictures of the car and tag. I never turned them in. But I wanted to. I mellowed in time. But I understand how your brother feels which is probably heightened by your needing them on occasion. Bravo to you for having good days. I hope you have a lot more.

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  8. There are too many selfish people around who think it's a right. I'm glad to hear of the examples of courtesy you have experienced, though. As you say, a matter of parental training.

    Just Been To See...Carmen

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  9. People who misuse handicapped spots are a big pet peeve of mine, as well. As you said though, sometimes the handicap isn't obvious, but they should have the proper stickers or plates for it. I gained a stronger appreciation for what disabled people go through when I broke my ankle in 1998 and wasn't allowed to walk at all for 8 weeks. Difference is, I got better, while they are dealing with it permanently. There are so many inconsiderate and rude people in this world! It makes the kind and courteous ones truly stand out.

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  10. It's quite rude to honk someone in a parking lot who you think isn't moving fast enough, particularly if the person being honked is assisting someone. The same goes for honking a parent who is taking time to strap a young child into a car seat. I know there is no lack of inconsiderate people in a rush, but that doesn't make it right.

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  11. I always refuse help-out with my grocery bags in case someone else truly needs the help. A line of cars honked at me one stormy afternoon when I got out of my car at a stoplight to help a man who had flipped his wheelchair while trying to climb a sidewalk curb. The man had no legs, but he sure had gratitude. The lack of compassion of the other drivers was/is appalling. I was going to remark about the cool vintage car - until I saw the caption below.

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  12. Honking at anyone to hurry while they're in a handicapped spot is horribly rude. Find another spot for goodness sake.

    The handicapped spots around here are policed pretty well. I don't think there's a quicker way to get fined than parking in one without a tag.

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  13. My husband had a tough time recovering from radiation and moved super-slow for several months. He said it was good practice for when he doubles his age, and it also taught him to be courteous to others who couldn't move fast. I will admit to always being in a rush, but I hope that if I do walk past or around a person in a chair or walker, that I do so without disturbing them in any way.

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  14. I've seen people hop out of their cars, laughing and being silly. Walking fast and not looking like they needed the spot. Then I've heard of people using the signs that hang on the mirror. It's a weird thing that I don't get it. Thoughtless, I say.

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