Making a Peach Cobbler

There are two types of cobblers.

One cobbler is made with fruit stewed in the bottom with a layer of biscuits on top. I bet a layer of yeast rolls would be good. I don't know if the bottom of the dough would cook enough. But how many people make yeast dough nowadays.

What makes a good biscuit is the type of flour you use. There is bread flour which is heavier with a higher protein content. The protein makes more gluten. A high protein flour makes a denser bread which is not good when you want a light fluffy biscuit.

A low protein, all purpose flour like White Lily makes a good biscuit. How do you make a biscuit? A hot oven helps. I cook biscuits at about 425 degrees. I purchase self rising flour. You can use plain flour but you have to add 1/4 teaspoon of salt and 1 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder for each cup of flour.

The next big trick with biscuit dough is you have to beat it by hand with a strong fork until the dough pulls together. It's that gluten thing going on. Once that happens you can pat your dough on a floured surface and cut biscuits to the shape you desire.

I have an old orange juice can my mother used when I was a kid. Frozen orange juice hasn't come in a can for at least 40 to 50 years. I shudder to think someone will just chunk it one day. Lately I drop biscuit dough in a muffin tin I have sprayed with PAM which brings me back to what you put into biscuit dough.

I use about 2 heaping cups of flour. If we don't eat all the biscuits, the dogs will. I put some oil in. I might drizzle some olive oil or cut in some softened butter into the flour. Maybe 2 to 4 tablespoons of butter but about 1 to 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Some people use shortening for the oil and some add a bit of sugar. I don't use sugar.

Then I add milk or buttermilk to the flour and stir vigorously until the dough pulls. If you get it too soupy, it makes a better muffin biscuit. You can add more flour if you want to roll the dough out. Buttermilk makes a lighter biscuit in that the acid it contains reacts with the baking powder to produce a gas. Self rising flour already contains salt and baking powder.

For a cobbler with biscuits on top, you want a dough you can roll out. But you don't want a stiff dough or you will have those legendary hard as a rock biscuit. Dense dough makes dense bread. You can add sugar to the biscuit mix. You do that before you add the liquid. Generally the fruit below is well sweetened.

I use this sort of  biscuit for fruit that will not maintain it's shape. An example would be blackberries, I would create a stew or jam of the berries and add sugar. Then drop biscuit dough on top. You can cut the biscuits and push them together or drop biscuit dough on the top.

The more you reshape dough and roll it in more flower, the more that dough will create a lousy biscuit. If you hate to waste the scrapes. Put the scraps in a biscuit shaped pile on the baking pan and cook them that way. I always just drop biscuit dough on top for a cobbler and use a glass baking dish. I don't like the metal taste food can acquire in a metal baking dish.

The second type of cobbler has a layer of fruit with a liquid dough poured over it. Apples and peaches are good fruits for this. Layer sliced fruit on the pan. Season with cinnamon or other spices you like. Nuts and raisins are good on the apples. You can put pats of butter on the fruit if you like the taste of butter a lot. It is good without butter. I use PAM on the glass pan before I place the fruit in.

You have a choice. Sprinkle sugar or sweetener like Splenda on the fruit. I don't use a lot of sugar. I get a lot of compliments on my baked goods. I halve the amount of sugar in everything. Sugar and salt are used heavily in processed foods and restaurant food to hide the inferior quality of the food being served. Plus the more salt and sugar you eat, the less you can taste it. Have you ever noticed smokers can eat the hottest salsa?

The dough is 1 part milk to 1 part self rising flour. That is 1 cup of milk to 1 cup of flour or 2 cups of milk to 2 cups of flour. I add 1/2 part sugar. You may want to make sugar 1 part.

My way is 1/2 cup sugar, 1 cup milk and 1 cup self rising flour.

I cook my cobbler in a 400 degree oven. For biscuits on top, I cook it until the biscuits have browned. For the soupy dough, I cook it about 25 to 30 minutes.

Anyway, the Elberta peaches are in this week and we are enjoying them.

How do you make your cobbler, biscuits on top or with the soupy dough bread? Or do you make a pie instead?

Comments

  1. No cobbler for me. I'm off sugar and flour.

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    1. I was successful dieting a few years ago. Then I started eating bread again and the weight loss stopped. I use Splenda which is probably not that good for you either.

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  2. Hi Ann - I don't tend to make desserts ... but then I'm not cooking for anyone - but Mum and I used to make a lot of cobblers ... sweet and savoury ... cheers Hilary

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    1. I do like to make a chicken pie. My only problem is my mother does not like the way I make them. lol Thanks for visiting.

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  3. My mother always made the first kind and it would all blend together into yummy goodness. Sadly, I never got her recipe.

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    1. I remember my grandmother's cobbler. It was a strange affair but quite good. It was fruit with firm dough in a deep dish. I was a picky eater and never tried it.

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  4. trying this one in the next few day,yum! I love anything peach

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    1. Elberta peaches are in which are the best of all the peaches. I like them raw but a bowl of baked peaches is quite good. I don't need the cobbler.

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  5. Can't say I've ever ate cobbler or even knew anyone that cooked it.

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    1. What part of Canada are you from? I thought you guys were the master of the cobbler or pie. I bet you have eaten your share of crusty buns.

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  6. Hi Ann,

    It has been a long time since I had a cobbler. I do like the one that requires peaches. Of course, I do try to avoid getting shoes in the recipe. That would be a load of old cobblers, to use a UK expression :)

    Thanks for this.

    Gary

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    1. If you lived close enough, I would bake you a cobbler sans the shoes.

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  7. Funny, I just saw a video on making peach cobbler on Facebook today and it got me thinking how much I'd like to make a cobbler, peach or berry, served with a really good quality vanilla ice cream. I prefer the one with liquid dough mixed in.

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    1. I like the cooked fruit with a good ice cream. Ice cream and doughnuts are my favorite treats. I guess if they were healthy foods, they would not be as appealing.

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  8. I don't bake, I just eat. Can't remember when I last had a peach cobbler though - if ever! This post made me hungry.

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    1. If you ever make it stateside her, I'll bake you one.

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  9. Awesome tips! I chuckled when you said, "I don't use sugar." LOL. I've been reading and watching all this anti-sugar stuff lately, and I'm convinced more than ever that it's one of the worst things we can put in our bodies.

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    1. My weakness is soda. I stopped drinking diet sodas and drank less soda but the sugar variety. It may have happened anyway; but, I have type 2 diabetes. Looking back, less soda but diet soda would have been a good idea for me.

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